Monday, December 5, 2016

Circles of Delight: Classic Carousels of San Francisco

Circles of Delight: Classic Carousels of San Francisco
author: Aaron Shepard
name: Wayne
average rating: 4.43
book published:
rating: 4
read at: 2016/12/05
date added: 2016/12/05
shelves: non-fiction
review:
'Circles of Delight: Classic Carousels of San Francisco' by Aaron Shepard is a pictorial look at three carousels in San Francisco. The city boasts carousels by all three of the most important American carousel makers.

The three carousels featured are at the San Francisco Zoo, Yerba Buena Gardens, and Golden Gate Park. Each section begins with a history of the carousel, such as where it was built and where it was located before it ended up in it's current location. Also included are renovation dates and unusual features of the carousel.

After the introduction, pages are devoted to photographs of the carousel animals, close ups of interesting details, and shield and rounding board details. Of the three carousels featured, my favorite was the Golden Gate Park carousel, which is the last one in the book.

The photographer spent three days photographing the carousels while on a business trip to the city. The pictures are good and the detail is worth studying. I enjoyed reading the brief history of each carousel, and looking through the photos.

I received a review copy of this ebook from Shepard Publications and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this ebook.


via Wayne's bookshelf: read http://ift.tt/2g4hsPZ

Sunday, December 4, 2016

Malice in Ovenland: Vol. 1

Malice in Ovenland: Vol. 1
author: Micheline Hess
name: Wayne
average rating: 3.46
book published:
rating: 3
read at: 2016/12/04
date added: 2016/12/04
shelves: children-s, graphic-novels
review:
'Malice in Ovenland: Vol. 1' by Micheline Hess collects the first 5 issues of the comic. I've read some of the individual issues out of order, so it was nice to get all the context.

Lily Brown used to love her mom's cooking, until her mom started eating healthier. When Lily is left home to do chores, she loses an earring in the stove while she is cleaning it. Climbing in after it, she falls into a hole behind the stove and finds herself in a strange world that lives below her stove. It is ruled by strange creatures that live off of grease, but with Lily's mom's new diet, the supply of grease has kind of dried up. Lily is imprisoned, but finds strange allies in this new world, including someone who may have a new idea of how to feed this world.

It's a strange story, and all the grease references are a little gross, but maybe that's the point. The art is perfectly fine for this book, and it's a good story for younger readers. Lily is a brave hero and her new friends show us that we can find help in places that you may not be looking for it in.

I received a review copy of this graphic novel from Rosarium Publishing and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.


via Wayne's bookshelf: read http://ift.tt/2h8UWud

Korgi Book 4: The Problem with Potions

Korgi Book 4: The Problem with Potions
author: Christian Slade
name: Wayne
average rating: 3.86
book published:
rating: 3
read at: 2016/12/04
date added: 2016/12/04
shelves: graphic-novels
review:
I wasn't familiar with Christian Slade's Korgi series, but when I had a chance to review Book 4, I thought I would give it a chance. What I found inside was an enchanting world filled with magic and dogs.

After a short introduction, we are off on our adventure into a wordless world of black and white ink drawings. In this world, hunan looking woodland creatures called Mollies live with Korgis. There is an evil here in the form of a two-headed creature known as Derog-Glaw who rules the evil Creephogs. In this story, the creephogs are sent out to capture the story's main korgi, Sprout, using a magic potion. Due to a mix up the potion doesn't have the effect that the Creephog wants and Sprout grows really big (and spotted and other side effects). This doesn't make Derog-Glaw very happy, so they form a new plan that ends up involving an undead unicorn in a goofy disguise.

I'll say no more about the story in order to avoid spoilers, but I found myself entranced by this unusual world. I wish I had read the glossary at the end first in order to have a better understanding of the world and how it works. Stories told without words can be difficult, but with Christian Slade's art and storytelling, I never felt like I had lost the thread of the story.

I received a review copy of this graphic novel from Top Shelf Productions, Diamond Book Distributors, and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.


via Wayne's bookshelf: read http://ift.tt/2gWtLzW

Futuristic Violence and Fancy Suits

Futuristic Violence and Fancy Suits
author: David Wong
name: Wayne
average rating: 3.98
book published: 2015
rating: 2
read at: 2016/12/04
date added: 2016/12/04
shelves: sword-and-laser
review:
'Furturistic Violence and Fancy Suits' is by David Wong. I read 'John Dies at the End' by the same author and really didn't care for it. When it came up as a book club pick, I seriously thought about passing on it, but I ended up reading it and finishing it.

I like the main character, Zoey, who is plucked from her mundane life and put in the sights of killers when she inherits things from her deceased father. She really wants nothing to do with it all, but decides to go along with it, or is coerced. She's reluctant, but not stupid. Her main antagonist is a person named Molech, who keeps describing the horrible ways he is going to kill Zoey and her mother. That got tedious.

So did all the mysogyny, juvenile humor, over the top violence and unexplainable technology. There were characters I liked so I stuck with it. I didn't hate it as much as the other book by the same author. A lot of people seem to like this author, and that's fine. The nice thing about books is that there are a lot of them, and we can all have our favorites.


via Wayne's bookshelf: read http://ift.tt/2g9fhxR

The Wild West: 1804-1890

The Wild West: 1804-1890
author: James I Robertson
name: Wayne
average rating: 4.67
book published:
rating: 5
read at: 2016/12/04
date added: 2016/12/04
shelves: children-s, non-fiction
review:
'The Wild West: 1804-1890' is part of a series called See American History. The text is by James I. Robertson, Jr. and the gorgeous paintings by Mort K√ľnstler. The book is aimed at school age kids.

The book starts before 1804 with events that set the era. There was exploration by the Spanish, and the people who first lived on the land, and there were people staking claims on the land, like the Franciscans and the Russians.

The book gets started in the time frame with the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Along the way, we visit the Alamo, the Golden Spike, the discovery of gold, buffalo hunters and buffalo soldiers and others. For a book that is only 49 pages, there is a lot covered in a short amount of space. It is by no means thorough, but it gives a good overview.

The paintings on each page are breathtaking. There is life and action in each picture. There are native Americans on buffalo hunts, and stage coaches pulled by horses with manes flying. There is motion in just about every picture, but even in the ones with figures just standing, the painting draws the eye. I loved books like this when I was young, and it's good to see that something like this is still being produced. I would buy it for the paintings alone, but the text is interesting and readable as well.

I received a review copy of this ebook from Abbeville Kids and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this ebook.


via Wayne's bookshelf: read http://ift.tt/2gq8EVw

Big Nate: Thunka, Thunka, Thunka

Big Nate: Thunka, Thunka, Thunka
author: Lincoln Peirce
name: Wayne
average rating: 4.40
book published: 2016
rating: 4
read at: 2016/12/04
date added: 2016/12/04
shelves: graphic-novels, children-s
review:



via Wayne's bookshelf: read http://ift.tt/2gq3dG7

Saturday, December 3, 2016

Wynonna Earp Volume 1: Homecoming (Wynonna Earp #1-6)

Wynonna Earp Volume 1: Homecoming (Wynonna Earp #1-6)
author: Beau Smith
name: Wayne
average rating: 3.52
book published:
rating: 2
read at: 2016/12/03
date added: 2016/12/03
shelves: graphic-novels
review:
'Wynonna Earp Volume 1: Homecoming' by Beau Smith with art by Lora Innes and Chris Evenhuis should have been a sure thing for me. A cross between Western and urban fantasy should have been easy for me to like. But it wasn't.

It was originally a comic, then more recently became a television series (which I haven't seen), and this is a new graphic novel based on both, I think.

Wynonna Earp is a descendant of Wyatt Earp. She shoots first and asks questions later, which annoys her boss Agent Doll. There is also a mysterious, or so we are told multiple times, character named John Henry. Wynonna goes around fighting supernatural creatures. From a cult of demons that drink milk and blood, to a mall full of zombies, Wynonna is called in to kick butt. There is also a case that takes her back to her family's roots.

Again, the setting and premise should have been a shoo in for me, but it is so tepid that I feel disappointed. The art is also not very spectacular for the most part. It's an interesting set of characters, but I have a hard time recommending it.

I received a review copy of this graphic novel from IDW Publishing and Diamond Book Distributors in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.


via Wayne's bookshelf: read http://ift.tt/2h12ETe