Saturday, April 22, 2017

Simone: The Best Monster Ever!

Simone: The Best Monster Ever!
author: Rémy Simard
name: Wayne
average rating: 3.40
book published:
rating: 4
read at: 2017/04/22
date added: 2017/04/22
shelves: children-s, graphic-novels
review:



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The Fun Family

The Fun Family
author: Benjamin Frisch
name: Wayne
average rating: 2.83
book published:
rating: 1
read at:
date added: 2017/04/22
shelves: graphic-novels
review:
'The Fun Family' by Benjamin Frisch is a harsh look at modern family life that starts out rather humorous, but at 240 pages, it wears a bit thin.

Robert Fun is a successful cartoonist who has a cartoon that is reminiscent of The Family Circus by Bil and Jeff Keane. The Fun family seems to live a picturesque and idealic life, but hiding beneath the surface are all kinds of weird things. It takes the death of a beloved family member to send Robert over the edge. His marriage falls apart and his son Robbie is left to continue the strip, even though he is only a child. There are collector obsessions, pop psychology obsessions, and religion obsessions among the many extremes that this family finds itself in.

The moral is normal is weird, or normal people are really sick, or something like that. I got the nods to problems with American culture and their need to obsess over things. I liked the idea of it being based on a familiar comic strip, and there are some gags that are pretty clever. The problem is that by the end, I felt beat over the head and I don't know that I felt any sympathy for any character.

I received a review copy of this graphic novel from Top Shelf Productions, Diamond Book Distributors, and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.


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Thursday, April 20, 2017

Mythic, Volume 1

Mythic, Volume 1
author: Phil Hester
name: Wayne
average rating: 3.35
book published: 2016
rating: 2
read at:
date added: 2017/04/20
shelves: graphic-novels
review:
'Mythic, Volume 1' by Phil Hester and John McCrea seemed like an interesting, if perhaps overused, idea: a secret society that works behind the scenes to save the world. Unfortunately, I felt like the execution was kind of a hot mess.

It turns out that science is a lie, not religion. But magic can go wrong, and when it does, the MYTHIC team goes around fixing it. With varied team members like the goddess Venus, an Apache shaman and a guy who fixes cell phones, they are the front line. When the rest of the MYTHIC teams disappear worldwide, it's going to be up to these people.

The art is good enough, but it all degenerates into crass humor and weird situations. If it's supposed to be funny, it seems to be doing that using shock humor at the expense of the reader. The situations and jokes just felt like hammer blows. There are other similar type stories and teams that have done this better. Which is a shame, because the art was pretty decent. It's too bad the script wasn't.

I received a review copy of this graphic novel from Image Comics, Diamond Book Distributors, and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.


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Fire Starters

Fire Starters
author: Jen Storm
name: Wayne
average rating: 4.00
book published:
rating: 4
read at:
date added: 2017/04/20
shelves: graphic-novels, young-adult
review:
'Fire Starters' by Jen Storm with art by Scott Henderson tells a good moral fable for younger readers. It works well in a graphic novel form.

Ron and Ben live on the Agamiing Reserve. Their grandmother looks after them when their mother is away. When they find an old flare gun in their deceased uncle's tackle box, they decide to take it to the dump and shoot it off. When the gas bar is burned down, they are accused, but the real person who did it won't come forward.

It's a story that feels like an after school special, but there's nothing wrong with that kind of story in a graphic novel format. The message of racism is a bit strong, but maybe that's not so bad either. The art is pretty good, and I enjoyed this story.

I received a review copy of this graphic novel from Portage & Main Press, Highwater Press, and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.


via Wayne's bookshelf: read http://ift.tt/2oa2xwn

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Want to Know. The Romans

Want to Know. The Romans
author: Suzan Boshouwers
name: Wayne
average rating: 4.00
book published:
rating: 4
read at: 2017/04/19
date added: 2017/04/19
shelves: children-s, non-fiction
review:
'Want to Know: The Romans' by Suzan Boshouwers with illustrations by Veronica Nahmias is a non-fiction instructional picture book for very young readers. It's a very well done project.

The reader is taken through different phases of ancient Roman life. The pictures fold out on some pages. Objects in the pictures are labelled so that readers can discover what they were called. The reader learns about Roman soldiers, the marketplace and what home life looked like. Festivals and Roman gods find their place too.

The pictures are detailed and filled with all kinds of objects. They are pointed out with text. I really enjoyed this approach to teaching young children about an ancient culture.

I received a review copy of this ebook from Clavis Books and Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this ebook.


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Little Tails in the Savannah

Little Tails in the Savannah
author: Frédéric Brrémaud
name: Wayne
average rating: 3.89
book published:
rating: 4
read at: 2017/04/19
date added: 2017/04/19
shelves: children-s, graphic-novels
review:
'Little Tails in the Savannah' by Frédéric Brrémaud and Federico Bertolucci follows Chipper and Squizzo on another adventure. The art of the Savannah is beautiful since this graphic novel is by the same people behind the stunning Love series featuring tigers, a fox, and dinosaurs.

Chipper and Squizzo set out on another adventure, but Squizzo's plane starts acting up, so they are on foot in the Savannah. They encounter a series of animals up close. Some are a bit too close for Chipper's taste. They see dung beetles, black mambas, a sleeping lion and many other animals. As night falls, they encounter a few night creatures too. They even find some help for getting their airplane fixed.

This is the third volume in the series. As in the previous ones, Chipper and Squizzo are presented as cartoon panels touring above the art. The art of the Savannah animals is gorgeous and full of color. I like this series for introducing younger readers to the world of animals. There is also a short bit of information at the end for the animals encountered.

I received a review copy of this graphic novel from Diamond Book Distributors, Magnetic Press, and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.


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Sword in the Stacks (The Ninja Librarians #2)

Sword in the Stacks (The Ninja Librarians #2)
author: Jen Swann Downey
name: Wayne
average rating: 3.98
book published: 2015
rating: 3
read at: 2017/04/19
date added: 2017/04/19
shelves: children-s
review:
'Sword in the Stacks' is the second book in the Ninja Librarians series by Jen Swann Downey. It's a series about kids on adventures in a series of libraries that can take people into the past.

Dorrie and Marcus are home safe from their last adventure when they get some strange visitors and an interesting invitation. They are invited to go to Petrarch's Library for the Summer Quarter. Their parents seem a bit oblivious to any danger that the library might hold or even leaving their kids in the hands of these strangers, so they agree.

The story mainly follows Dorrie as she makes friends, takes classes and discovers the mysteries surrounding what the bad guys, known as The Foundation, are up to.

I didn't read the first book, but I felt like I was given enough information to follow along just fine, but I'm still not really sure why the series is called The Ninja Librarians since they are not ninjas and the title they use is lybrarian. As far as young reader adventures go, its ok. Nothing spectacular, but nothing too terrible either.

I received a review copy of this ebook from Sourcebooks Jabberwocky and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this ebook.


via Wayne's bookshelf: read http://ift.tt/2o5OqbL