Saturday, November 18, 2017

Her Majesty: An Illustrated Guide to the Women who Ruled the World (Women in History)

Her Majesty: An Illustrated Guide to the Women who Ruled the World (Women in History)
author: Lisa Graves
name: Wayne
average rating: 3.74
book published: 2015
rating: 4
read at: 2017/11/18
date added: 2017/11/18
shelves: non-fiction, children-s
review:
'Her Majesty: An Illustrated Guide to the Women who Ruled the World' by Lisa Graves is a look at famous and infamous rulers. It shows the kinds of influence and power they had.

The women featured in the book are from many countries and times starting with Hapshepsut of Egypt and going all the way to Tsarina Alexandra of Russia. Each woman gets a full page painting and a short bio including their greatest achievement. For Queen Victoria, this was surviving six assassination attempts. For Lakshmibai, the Rani of Jhansi, it was leading her people in fighting against their oppressors.

This is book full of facts and great pictures. It doesn't include every woman ruler, but it includes a very interesting selection.

I received a review copy of this ebook from Xist Publishing and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this ebook.


via Wayne's bookshelf: read http://ift.tt/2zNPzcN

I Give You My Heart

I Give You My Heart
author: Pimm Hest
name: Wayne
average rating: 4.17
book published:
rating: 5
read at: 2017/11/18
date added: 2017/11/18
shelves: children-s
review:
'I Give You My Heart' by Pimm Hest with art by Sassafras Bruyn is a relective picture book with a beautiful story and pictures.

Young Yuto receives a special gift, and he is told that everything he needs is in the box. When Yuto is finally able to open this gift, he finds a seed. He plants the seed, with some advice about finding the right spot. With love anything can grow, he is told.

And time passes. Yuto grows up and so does the tree. When it is time, he knows what to do.

It's a beautiful story about making a life. Told in a way that is simple enough for the young to understand. I've been a fan of Sassafras Bruyn's illustration work, which is the main reason the tile caught my eye, and I was not disappointed. The pictures have a complexity to them that is not often seen in picture books. There is a lot to see and read in them.

I received a review copy of this ebook from Clavis Publishing and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this ebook.


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The Scribble Squad in the Weird Wild West

The Scribble Squad in the Weird Wild West
author: Donald "Scribe" Ross
name: Wayne
average rating: 3.60
book published:
rating: 2
read at: 2017/11/18
date added: 2017/11/18
shelves: children-s
review:
'The Scribble Squad in the Weird Wild West' by Donald "Scribe" Ross is a young reader book with lots of pictures. It takes place in the old west, and that is where some of the problems come in to play.

Rumpus, Tai, Phil, and Phlox are a group of animal friends invited to create a mural. They choose a theme, but they end up disagreeing on what should be painted, so the painting ends up with all kinds of crazy things.

And then they end up on the other side of the mural in a land full of spray paint can rattlesnakes and large rideable hamsters. They find lots of secrets and a town that is being run by an evil group. Can they help?

There are all kinds of animals, but the indigenous people are all birds. They also have access to all the gold, but don't seem to want to do anything with it except protect it. There are all sorts of weird stereotypes with this group of people. Noble, mystical, mysterious, but definitely not like the other characters. Also, some of the themes of the book seems to be that graffiti and vandalism are ok.

I'm all for promoting the arts, and I'm not even really opposed to lawful graffiti. I really had more problems with the weird take on history that this book seems to take.

I received a review copy of this ebook from Andrews McMeel Publishing and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this ebook.


via Wayne's bookshelf: read http://ift.tt/2zTTbHT

Nick the Knight, Dragon Slayer

Nick the Knight, Dragon Slayer
author: Aron Dijkstra
name: Wayne
average rating: 3.96
book published:
rating: 4
read at: 2017/11/18
date added: 2017/11/18
shelves: children-s
review:
'Nick the Knight, Dragon Slayer' by Aron Dijkstra is about a tiny brave guy fighting an enormous dragon.

Nick the Knight is anxious to fight Breakhorn the dragon. The people in his town are afraid, but Nick will protect them. First he has to find the dragon. Once he does, the dragon refuses to fight such a tiny person, Nick will have to up his game. How will Nick defeat such a large dragon.

I really liked this story about courage and making new friends. The art is a lot of fun. I love Nick's curly, unruly hair, and Breakhorn's ornamentation.

I received a review copy of this ebook from Clavis Books and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this ebook.


via Wayne's bookshelf: read http://ift.tt/2zQnVMq

Wraithborn, Volume 1

Wraithborn, Volume 1
author: Joe Benítez
name: Wayne
average rating: 3.81
book published: 2006
rating: 3
read at: 2017/11/18
date added: 2017/11/18
shelves: graphic-novels
review:
'Wraighbor, Volume 1' by Joe Benitez with art by M. M. Chen is an origin story about someone recruited to fight supernatural evil.

Melanie Moore is a timid picked on girl going to school. Valek is a young warrior in training, waiting for the day he becomes the new Wraithborn. When Melanie is at the wrong place at the right time, she unwittingly becomes the new Wraithborn. Now she is being hunted and Valek is left to help her discover who she has become.

It's a pretty standard by-the-numbers story. It's hard to feel much for most of the characters because there just isn't a lot of development. Why Melanie trusts Valek is odd. Why Valek just doesn't kill Melanie and recover the Wraithborn based on her incompetence seems out of character for his overly serious demeanor. The art is pretty, but the characters all have overly long necks. Maybe that's the case in the Lady Mechanika book, but it just stood out here.

I received a review copy of this graphic novel from Benitez Productions, Diamond Book Distributors, and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.


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Manga Classics: The Stories of Edgar Allen Poe

Manga Classics: The Stories of Edgar Allen Poe
author: Stacy King
name: Wayne
average rating: 4.25
book published: 2017
rating: 4
read at: 2017/11/18
date added: 2017/11/18
shelves: graphic-novels
review:
'Manga Classics: The Stories of Edgar Allan Poe' by Edgar Allan Poe and adapted by Stacy King is a series of manga adaptations of poplular stories and poems.

Included in the collection are The Tell Tale Heart, The Cask of Amontillado and The Raven among others. Every story features a different artist and I liked all the styles but my favorite was The Raven by pikomaro. The art is really pretty good for all of these chapters.

The adaptations are really good as well. I've seen graphic novel adaptations that aren't as complete. The Masque of the Red Death story is allowed time to simmer and build as are all of them.

It's another great adaptation in the Manga Classics line. I grew up with Classics Illustrated, and these adaptations are more complete.

I received a review copy of this manga from Udon Entertainment, Manga Classics, and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this manga.


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Tuesday, November 14, 2017

The Invisible War: A Tale on Two Scales

The Invisible War: A Tale on Two Scales
author: Ailsa Wild
name: Wayne
average rating: 4.32
book published:
rating: 5
read at: 2017/11/14
date added: 2017/11/14
shelves: non-fiction, graphic-novels
review:
'The Invisible War: A Tale on Two Scales' by Alisa Wild with art by Briony Barr is a most unusual graphic novel. It tells two very different stories at the same time and both are very interesting.

The first story is about Sister Annie Barnaby treating soldiers in a field hospital during World War I. When a solder comes down with dysentery, she is curious about what is causing it.

The second story is the course of disease as a lethal bacteria enters Annie and threatens her life. This story is told on the microscopic level.

Throughout the story are links to short articles describing things like how patients were moved through field hospitals and what the shigella bacteria is. The story is also a bit on the graphic side with the side effects of disease and war.

The art is really good, as are the articles in the back of the book. This was one of the most unique graphic novels I've read in quite a while. I really enjoyed it.

I received a review copy of this graphic novel from Scale Free Network and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.


via Wayne's bookshelf: read http://ift.tt/2mp1V5E